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Madrid, Spain
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Transylvania, Romania
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Transylvania


Transylvania, Romania

Transylvania is a historical region in the central part of Romania. Before 1919 it used to belong to Hungary. Transylvania was first referred to in a Medieval Latin document in 1075 as ultra silvam, meaning "beyond the forest". The German name Siebenbürgen means "seven fortresses", after the seven (ethnic German) Transylvanian Saxons' cities in the region. The Hungarian form Erdély was first mentioned in the 12th-century Gesta Hungarorum as "Erdeuleu". Erdel, the Turkish equivalent originates from this form, too. The first known written occurrence of the Romanian name Ardeal appeared in a document in 1432 as Ardeliu.

Transylvania has been dominated by several different peoples and countries throughout its history. It was once the nucleus of the Kingdom of Dacia (82 BC–106 AD). In 106 AD the Roman Empire conquered the territory, systematically exploiting its resources. After the Roman legions withdrew in 271 AD, it was overrun by a succession of various tribes, bringing it under the control of the Carpi (Dacian tribe), Visigoths, Huns, Gepids, Avars, Slavs and Bulgarians. The Magyars conquered much of Central Europe at the end of the 9th century. According to Gesta Hungarorum, Transylvania was ruled by Vlach voivode Gelou after the Hungarians arrived. The Kingdom of Hungary firmly established control over Transylvania in 1003.


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Transylvania


Transylvania, Romania

Transylvania is a historical region in the central part of Romania. Before 1919 it used to belong to Hungary. Transylvania was first referred to in a Medieval Latin document in 1075 as ultra silvam, meaning "beyond the forest". The German name Siebenbürgen means "seven fortresses", after the seven (ethnic German) Transylvanian Saxons' cities in the region. The Hungarian form Erdély was first mentioned in the 12th-century Gesta Hungarorum as "Erdeuleu". Erdel, the Turkish equivalent originates from this form, too. The first known written occurrence of the Romanian name Ardeal appeared in a document in 1432 as Ardeliu.

Transylvania has been dominated by several different peoples and countries throughout its history. It was once the nucleus of the Kingdom of Dacia (82 BC–106 AD). In 106 AD the Roman Empire conquered the territory, systematically exploiting its resources. After the Roman legions withdrew in 271 AD, it was overrun by a succession of various tribes, bringing it under the control of the Carpi (Dacian tribe), Visigoths, Huns, Gepids, Avars, Slavs and Bulgarians. The Magyars conquered much of Central Europe at the end of the 9th century. According to Gesta Hungarorum, Transylvania was ruled by Vlach voivode Gelou after the Hungarians arrived. The Kingdom of Hungary firmly established control over Transylvania in 1003.
Read more »

Transylvania


Transylvania, Romania

Transylvania is a historical region in the central part of Romania. Before 1919 it used to belong to Hungary. Transylvania was first referred to in a Medieval Latin document in 1075 as ultra silvam, meaning "beyond the forest". The German name Siebenbürgen means "seven fortresses", after the seven (ethnic German) Transylvanian Saxons' cities in the region. The Hungarian form Erdély was first mentioned in the 12th-century Gesta Hungarorum as "Erdeuleu". Erdel, the Turkish equivalent originates from this form, too. The first known written occurrence of the Romanian name Ardeal appeared in a document in 1432 as Ardeliu.

Transylvania has been dominated by several different peoples and countries throughout its history. It was once the nucleus of the Kingdom of Dacia (82 BC–106 AD). In 106 AD the Roman Empire conquered the territory, systematically exploiting its resources. After the Roman legions withdrew in 271 AD, it was overrun by a succession of various tribes, bringing it under the control of the Carpi (Dacian tribe), Visigoths, Huns, Gepids, Avars, Slavs and Bulgarians. The Magyars conquered much of Central Europe at the end of the 9th century. According to Gesta Hungarorum, Transylvania was ruled by Vlach voivode Gelou after the Hungarians arrived. The Kingdom of Hungary firmly established control over Transylvania in 1003.
Read more »

Transylvania


Transylvania, Romania

Transylvania is a historical region in the central part of Romania. Before 1919 it used to belong to Hungary. Transylvania was first referred to in a Medieval Latin document in 1075 as ultra silvam, meaning "beyond the forest". The German name Siebenbürgen means "seven fortresses", after the seven (ethnic German) Transylvanian Saxons' cities in the region. The Hungarian form Erdély was first mentioned in the 12th-century Gesta Hungarorum as "Erdeuleu". Erdel, the Turkish equivalent originates from this form, too. The first known written occurrence of the Romanian name Ardeal appeared in a document in 1432 as Ardeliu.

Transylvania has been dominated by several different peoples and countries throughout its history. It was once the nucleus of the Kingdom of Dacia (82 BC–106 AD). In 106 AD the Roman Empire conquered the territory, systematically exploiting its resources. After the Roman legions withdrew in 271 AD, it was overrun by a succession of various tribes, bringing it under the control of the Carpi (Dacian tribe), Visigoths, Huns, Gepids, Avars, Slavs and Bulgarians. The Magyars conquered much of Central Europe at the end of the 9th century. According to Gesta Hungarorum, Transylvania was ruled by Vlach voivode Gelou after the Hungarians arrived. The Kingdom of Hungary firmly established control over Transylvania in 1003.
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Tusnadfurdo


Tusnádfürdő in Transylvania, Romania.

Băile Tușnad (Hungarian: Tusnádfürdő) is a town in Harghita County, Romania. It lies in the Székely Land, an ethno-cultural region in eastern Transylvania. With a population of 1,617, it is the smallest town in Romania by population. It is located at an altitude of 650 metres in the southern reaches of the Ciuc depression, between the Harghita and Bodoc mountains, in the valley of the Olt, and is to this day an important spa town.

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Organic cola


Organic cola? :)
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Holland


Railway station in Holland

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