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Natural disasters



“JerusalemHand”, an international organization that offers support and assistance to the victims of natural calamities all over the world. Their website provides a one of a kind opportunity for people to be heard  about Disaster News through publishing real and heartwarming life stories.

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Sailing ship in Tallinn


Tallinn, Estonia
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ANDRZEJ BURYAN PHOTOGRAPHY


Thai Long-Tail Boat in Ko He, Thailand on the wonderful photography of Andrzej Buryan. I like the mood of this photo very much. Andrzej's photoblog features incredible landscape photos, architectures and portraits.



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Charleston the beautiful city



April to June in Charleston is its peak, during these months are its Spring and early summer which are its finest season. This city has long cobblestone alleys and white columned mansions. While checking these mansions on Rainbow Row, beautiful wisteria, magnolias, azaleas and honeysuckle are blooming. Everywhere smells great, and looks fresh in this beautiful weather around 24 deg C.

In June are Spoleto Festival where arts and music celebration is about. Some keys must do are Boone Hall, the national monument Fort Sumter that honors the Fort and those patriots who have fought and died serving against the Confederacy. Wild Dunes, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Drayton Hall, Middleton Place and last but not least Charles Towne Landing.

If you like sports, the basketball games at College of Charleston is very entertaining, or Ravenel Bridge bike ride. To chill are the Sullivan’s Beach and Folly Beach. Must watch the Cooper River sunset.

For satisfying your tastebuds, try the Mason Jar Margarita at Yo Burrito and other food places to go are Poe’s Tavern for the taste of peanut butter burger. Shrimp and grits, or try the she-crab soup signature dish. In Charleston, you could also experience a shuttle by horse-drawn carriages before your dinner. Other dining experiences: try drinks or brunch at the Prohibition bar, and also the Hominy Grill’s “Big Nasty Biscuit”

Special souvenirs includes MoonPie’s snack-cake-scented candles and hand-woven Palmetto roses. Other must see are the Oak Trees with Spanish Moss, deer head in watering hole and Country bands.  Travel & Leisure Magazine has listed Charlston #2 in the world! 


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BOOK CHEAP HOTELS IN LAS VEGAS

Las Vegas Boulevard
(photo: James Marvin Phelps)

Cheap hotels in Las Vegas usually are not hard to find whenever you search online for top level hotel booking website that will help you search for the top Las Vegas hotel deals. Hotel booking engines normally offer customers using the option to view pictures of numerous hotels, so that they can get a good take on what to expect when arriving for their hotel destination associated with preference.

Hotel guest ratings and reviews offers customers using the quality rather bad or good that they should expect from various hotels doing the selecting process. The highest possible star rating expensive hotels can receive is often a five star S. The cheap hotels in Las Vegas are typically rated at 1 or 2 stars, but it is very possible to find some Las Vegas hotel deals at the 3 or 4 star hotels.

Here is really a list of Cheap 4 star hotels in Las Vegas for less than 40 dollars per night providing you with customers with great value for that price they may be paying.

Palms Place Hotel Spa 
Red Rock Casino Resort 
Paris 
MGM Grand 
Golden Nugget 
Tropicana 
New York Hotel and Casino 
Eastside Cannery Hotel and Casino

Listed below is are 3 star Hotels in Las Vegas for 35 dollars or even under 35$ per night that could offer great value for people who are on a budget.

Main Street Station Hotel 
Candlewood Suites 
Tuscany Suites and Casino 
The Orleans Hotel 
Sams Town Hotel and Gambling Hall 
Baymont Inn and Suits 
Blue Moon Resort for Gay Men

When clients are searching for an accommodation they are looking feel like these are at home and comfortable. They want to put all of their worries privately and enjoy their hotel stay as well as trip. Customers can also read about guest who did not have a good experience throughout their hotel stay. Some from the main issues that are mentioned are that the upkeep has not been up to par, the leading office desk clerk was rude, or we were holding responding slowly in helping them with their demands. There are times where things within the rooms don't work correctly, the bed is just not comfortable, or it has an odor that is certainly present throughout the room or lobby.

Looking out for an ideal Las Vegas hotel deals and booking the place in advance will help make the price less expensive than trying to book you reservations with the last minute. The location of the place is also something which many people consider in addition to getting close to the action, which plays a tremendous role when choosing the right hotel. Websites that gives you a lot of information including quality pictures of the place, star ratings, and guest reviews will go a long way in assisting you find hotels in Las Vegas. It would do you some good by a little bit of research prior to you buying your accommodations. This will help you to know what you should expect when arriving at your destination.
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Estonian Dance and Song Festival

Estonian Song and Dance Festival

Estonian Song and Dance Festival, Tallinn, Estonia.

The Estonian Song Fsong_festival is an enormous open-air choir concert held at the Tallinn Song Festival Grounds with the participation of hundreds of choirs and thousands of singers. The number of participants in the Song Festival can reach up to 25 or 30 thousand, but the greatest number of people is on stage during the performance of the joined choirs—there are usually 18 000 singers on stage at that moment, and their powerful song touches even the most frigid Nordic disposition.

History of the Song Festivals

In the 19th century, Estonia was a province of the Russian Empire, where German upper class landlords ruled the Estonian lower class - the peasants. The 1860s marked the beginning of the period of National Awakening. The Song Festival tradition began with the first Song Festival organised by Johann Voldemar Jannsen and the "Vanemuise" Society in Tartu in June 1869. Fifty-one male choirs and five brass bands encompassing 845 singers and musicians gathered in Tartu.

The first Song Festival was a high point for the Estonian national movement. The Song Festival was also a great musical event, which created the Song Festival tradition. Six Song Festivals were held from 1879-1910, and they played an important role in the nation's cultural and economic awakening and growth. The tradition of holding Song Festivals every five years began during the first Estonian independence. During World War II the tradition of Song Festivals was interrupted, but it began again in 1947. Since 1950, the Song Festivals have been held every five years. 1969 was an exception because the 100th anniversary of the Song Festival was celebrated.

The Song Festivals have taken place regardless of the political situation. The foreign authorities have tried to use the Song Festivals in their own interests. The Soviet regime always tied the Song Festivals to the "red holidays". Foreign and propagandist songs had to be sung in order to preserve the chance to sing Estonian songs. A good example of an Estonian song was "Land of my Fathers, Land That I Love" ("Mu isamaa on minu arm"), which during the occupation years became an unofficial anthem for the Estonians, and which, performed by the joined choirs to the standing audience, ended every Song Festival. (source: estonia.eu)
Read more »

Estonian Dance and Song Festival

Estonian Song and Dance Festival

Estonian Song and Dance Festival, Tallinn, Estonia.

The Estonian Song Fsong_festival is an enormous open-air choir concert held at the Tallinn Song Festival Grounds with the participation of hundreds of choirs and thousands of singers. The number of participants in the Song Festival can reach up to 25 or 30 thousand, but the greatest number of people is on stage during the performance of the joined choirs—there are usually 18 000 singers on stage at that moment, and their powerful song touches even the most frigid Nordic disposition.

History of the Song Festivals

In the 19th century, Estonia was a province of the Russian Empire, where German upper class landlords ruled the Estonian lower class - the peasants. The 1860s marked the beginning of the period of National Awakening. The Song Festival tradition began with the first Song Festival organised by Johann Voldemar Jannsen and the "Vanemuise" Society in Tartu in June 1869. Fifty-one male choirs and five brass bands encompassing 845 singers and musicians gathered in Tartu.

The first Song Festival was a high point for the Estonian national movement. The Song Festival was also a great musical event, which created the Song Festival tradition. Six Song Festivals were held from 1879-1910, and they played an important role in the nation's cultural and economic awakening and growth. The tradition of holding Song Festivals every five years began during the first Estonian independence. During World War II the tradition of Song Festivals was interrupted, but it began again in 1947. Since 1950, the Song Festivals have been held every five years. 1969 was an exception because the 100th anniversary of the Song Festival was celebrated.

The Song Festivals have taken place regardless of the political situation. The foreign authorities have tried to use the Song Festivals in their own interests. The Soviet regime always tied the Song Festivals to the "red holidays". Foreign and propagandist songs had to be sung in order to preserve the chance to sing Estonian songs. A good example of an Estonian song was "Land of my Fathers, Land That I Love" ("Mu isamaa on minu arm"), which during the occupation years became an unofficial anthem for the Estonians, and which, performed by the joined choirs to the standing audience, ended every Song Festival. (source: estonia.eu)
Read more »

Estonian Dance and Song Festival

Estonian Song and Dance Festival

Estonian Song and Dance Festival, Tallinn, Estonia.

The Estonian Song Fsong_festival is an enormous open-air choir concert held at the Tallinn Song Festival Grounds with the participation of hundreds of choirs and thousands of singers. The number of participants in the Song Festival can reach up to 25 or 30 thousand, but the greatest number of people is on stage during the performance of the joined choirs—there are usually 18 000 singers on stage at that moment, and their powerful song touches even the most frigid Nordic disposition.

History of the Song Festivals

In the 19th century, Estonia was a province of the Russian Empire, where German upper class landlords ruled the Estonian lower class - the peasants. The 1860s marked the beginning of the period of National Awakening. The Song Festival tradition began with the first Song Festival organised by Johann Voldemar Jannsen and the "Vanemuise" Society in Tartu in June 1869. Fifty-one male choirs and five brass bands encompassing 845 singers and musicians gathered in Tartu.

The first Song Festival was a high point for the Estonian national movement. The Song Festival was also a great musical event, which created the Song Festival tradition. Six Song Festivals were held from 1879-1910, and they played an important role in the nation's cultural and economic awakening and growth. The tradition of holding Song Festivals every five years began during the first Estonian independence. During World War II the tradition of Song Festivals was interrupted, but it began again in 1947. Since 1950, the Song Festivals have been held every five years. 1969 was an exception because the 100th anniversary of the Song Festival was celebrated.

The Song Festivals have taken place regardless of the political situation. The foreign authorities have tried to use the Song Festivals in their own interests. The Soviet regime always tied the Song Festivals to the "red holidays". Foreign and propagandist songs had to be sung in order to preserve the chance to sing Estonian songs. A good example of an Estonian song was "Land of my Fathers, Land That I Love" ("Mu isamaa on minu arm"), which during the occupation years became an unofficial anthem for the Estonians, and which, performed by the joined choirs to the standing audience, ended every Song Festival. (source: estonia.eu)
Read more »

Estonian Song and Dance Festival

Estonian Song and Dance Festival

Estonian Song and Dance Festival, Tallinn, Estonia.

The Estonian Song Fsong_festival is an enormous open-air choir concert held at the Tallinn Song Festival Grounds with the participation of hundreds of choirs and thousands of singers. The number of participants in the Song Festival can reach up to 25 or 30 thousand, but the greatest number of people is on stage during the performance of the joined choirs—there are usually 18 000 singers on stage at that moment, and their powerful song touches even the most frigid Nordic disposition.

History of the Song Festivals

In the 19th century, Estonia was a province of the Russian Empire, where German upper class landlords ruled the Estonian lower class - the peasants. The 1860s marked the beginning of the period of National Awakening. The Song Festival tradition began with the first Song Festival organised by Johann Voldemar Jannsen and the "Vanemuise" Society in Tartu in June 1869. Fifty-one male choirs and five brass bands encompassing 845 singers and musicians gathered in Tartu.

The first Song Festival was a high point for the Estonian national movement. The Song Festival was also a great musical event, which created the Song Festival tradition. Six Song Festivals were held from 1879-1910, and they played an important role in the nation's cultural and economic awakening and growth. The tradition of holding Song Festivals every five years began during the first Estonian independence. During World War II the tradition of Song Festivals was interrupted, but it began again in 1947. Since 1950, the Song Festivals have been held every five years. 1969 was an exception because the 100th anniversary of the Song Festival was celebrated.

The Song Festivals have taken place regardless of the political situation. The foreign authorities have tried to use the Song Festivals in their own interests. The Soviet regime always tied the Song Festivals to the "red holidays". Foreign and propagandist songs had to be sung in order to preserve the chance to sing Estonian songs. A good example of an Estonian song was "Land of my Fathers, Land That I Love" ("Mu isamaa on minu arm"), which during the occupation years became an unofficial anthem for the Estonians, and which, performed by the joined choirs to the standing audience, ended every Song Festival. (source: estonia.eu)


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